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Well, it seems to me that the crowd that's there now are into muscly guys as I said. And fanart works as always, so if you know of any popular ones, that's a good way to get people to see your gallery. I've found that you can reorder the artwork that you're viewing to show all the ones that are most "popular". I can't really say it's "most faved" because it's not based on the actual number of faves a particular piece gets, but based on the ratio of views compared with faves (more faves per view is better). According to this technique, the most popular clubs there now are Bara, Naruto, Shota (I have no idea about that one) and Death Note.

But if you're content with drawing women, that's fine too. When it comes to drawing, I think that it's just best to do what you feel like doing.

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I have known a few people who are jealous about people who draw better than they do. It's a natural feeling though; I have feelings like that too, but it just motivates me to do better.

I wouldn't say that simply drawing would make you better. You kind of have to pay attention to what you're drawing and care about why or how you're going to improve. At least if it's about something technical like realism, you'll eventually end up having to know why it works. I don't think brainlessly drawing the same few things over and over again necessarily helps; you might draw it differently, but it won't be any better and on a consistent basis unless you can figure out what's going on.

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I actually have an account there too, and while I've been there long enough, I've noticed they've been changing stuff a lot. Like ownership of the place, and they've been shuffling through so many mods that it's hard to say if any of them are any nicer or meaner. In fact, just recently, I think they've hired a few new mods, some tech people and someone else is taking over. I can't speak about how nice the mods are in terms of what they do or how they ban people because I've never been affected. I did once have someone complain about using the Dissidia logo in one of my pieces, but it wasn't a big deal and I never got banned. I did notice recently though that there's been a huge shift in focus. Back when I joined, bishounen men was the thing. If you looked at all the featured works and all the works that made it to the top, you would see these skinny guys. Now if you look at them, it's usually fanart (as always) and muscly bara guys. Not to say that you can't find the occasional bishi guy in the featured section every now and then, but chances are, you're more likely to find artwork of big, bearish guys. I'm guessing the majority of people who had a problem with the mods primarily drew bishi guys, and probably never came back. Not to say it doesn't happen to people who draw bara, because I recall a particularly popular member there who got accused of tracing once, but I think if people left Y! Gallery, it was mostly when there were more people drawing bishounen characters.

Now I think they're just trying to keep their members happy by hiring people that might get along well with most members and having contests like that recent one about getting a new mascot.

But that they might be a little strict about content doesn't exactly bother me. Hentai-Foundry does it too, and I think they're even more critical about what they accept, but I think when you have a gallery that's geared towards specific content, which involves some degree of realism or a derivative of it (eg, cartoons) and human characters, there's more restrictions on what can and cannot be put in your gallery, and there's more emphasis on anatomy, which I think is an easy target for tracing. That's why DeviantArt doesn't have this problem because they're not very specific about the theme or content of your art.

The only time I ever recall Y! Gallery being in danger of shutting down was that they couldn't find a tech admin to manage the site, but it never really was a problem because there was a good response, and they ended up having lots of people apply for that position.

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I've found that with parents, you just can't win. You can have the best argument ever, and still not win. They can kick you out anytime, and unless you're willing or able to support yourself, there's not really much you can do. My only solution is to give them what they want (or pretend to do it so well they never notice), and at the same time, find a compromise that works for yourself. I suppose you'd have to be a bit creative. Find some friends or other people accepting of LGBT people; your mother doesn't need to know that about them if it bothers her.

 

There are some people you just can't change; it could be nearly impossible if you tried. It might be easier if she couldn't hold kicking you out over your head.

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Perhaps try an LGBT parade or festival? I went to one of those once, and it was pretty interesting; they might occasionally have some other booths there not related to sexual orientation. Unitarians set up a booth there too. It might be easier if she mutually had a reason to go there, like if she had to go shopping nearby or something.

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I'm actually rather careful about drawing smut in public areas. In fact, I only do it at home, and when no one else is around. I don't do it in public, nor do I let people know I draw this stuff because they probably won't believe any reason I give them for doing so (honestly, I do it, not just for the anatomy but because I enjoy seeing people squirm in their pants to some artwork I did). Now if there was an art meetup nearby that does draw smut, I wouldn't have a problem with that...Problem is, I don't know where to look...

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Well, I told my friend that I hadn't exactly aimed for the "German" male look, as I wouldn't know what that looks like; I was aiming to make my characters appear more European. I guess it's seemed to work, although a fellow artist from Germany has said that there isn't a particular characteristic that defines German males from other Europeans; they're generally about the same.

Generally, for male faces, I find the following attractive: Large/long pointy noses, smaller eyes, thicker eyebrows, wrinkles, well defined bone structure.

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I actually don't really care--so long as they're drawn well. Personally though, I prefer drawing them uncut--erect is a different story though.

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My style involves strong, angular strokes--I think that's why my women don't look so much like women. I like adding details and well defined features, which is probably why my characters end up appearing so toned and muscled.

A fellow artist commented by saying that I draw very "German" male faces because of the well defined chins and noses.

I usually start with a base sketch and build off of it, but the final drawing often ends up quite differently because I start to notice problems with perspective or just the placement of things. For some reason, I find it harder to notice those things with base sketches.

I usually don't bother to clean my lines though; they'll end up being covered up by the color.