Lost to the Current

Posted Jun 26, 2018, 6:44:43 AM

Introducing another of my mer species, the alimer~ To distinguish different peoples in conversation (whether they're mer or cetacean), all the names for mer species (given by mers, at least) end in mer, all dolphin peoples end in lif, and whales end in bol- it varies language to language, but standard endings are almost universal.

Merfolk and cetacean peoples often live in the same pods with a symbiotic relationship, a practice originally started by the nomadic Krauyimer/Niovmer. Alimer, unlike Krauyimer, live in warm waters (often reefs) and are extremely sedementary. Their biology doesn't allow for effective heat regulation to survive colder temperatures, and they don't handle higher pressures particularly well. Their long and flexible tails are excellent for wrapping around things to hold on, however, this is precisely what makes them horrible swimmers- the long motions their tails make in attempt to swim both are ineffective and generate motion only in their tail sections, making swimming impractical as a means of transportation, thus sedementary life suits them better. Crafts and tools are a larger part of their lives than that of any other race of mer due to this disadvantage, and as such their dwellings are easy to spot but far less so to attack. They were one of the first mers to follow Niovmer in symbiosis with dolphins, as they help significantly with moving around. Here, a strong current came through and dislodged a alimer youth, but thankfully, their cetacean friend has them covered, much to their parent's gratitude~

Fun fact: Alimer are also known as Dragon mer due to their extensive, thick plate scales, which provide them with high defensive capacitiy. They have few natural predators due to this, even among sharks.

Art and species belong to me.

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Comments

  • Jun 30, 2018
    This piece has a nice rhythm to it. You did a great job of giving the alimer a nice S curve.