tigers

Posted Nov 12, 2006, 9:47:56 PM
just an old pic.i found that i wanted to post. this is when i was just starting to get the hang of coloring in photoshop. ^^

Post a comment

Constructive Critique requested. See Tips.

Comments

  • Nov 14, 2006
    Cool tigers! Great job Grin
  • Nov 14, 2006
    Aha! We have the totally opposite problem in this one to that other one I commented on ^^ The subject here is too dark at the white becomes the subject here O.o Silhoettes only work if the shape is interesting and acurate. Again, you need to find where your light sorce is rather than giving it random shadows over it's body- they look sort of like dents... Those plants would look really good if you bumped some back or forward with darker and lighter colours over the whole leaf

    Side line note- the denty looking sadows were a texture for fur- right? It' would be alot easier to show fur texture with short, skinny brighter lines in the lighter and darker areas to show lighting change. That's my 2 cents ^^
    • Nov 14, 2006
      hey, thanx a lot for both your crits. ^^
      identifying the light source and placing the shadows accordingly is definantly something i will be sure to keep in mind from now on.
      as well as making sure the subject of the artwork is clearly identified.
      you've brought many important details to my attention and it has been really helpful.
      thanx again. ^^
      • Nov 14, 2006
        No prob ^^Done right, lighting is difficult to notice, but done wrong ,it stands out alot and sometimes the mind notices but doesn't understand why. Remember, artistic lisence can allowe alot of unnatral lighting, but learnt the correct way first Yes Then you can break the rules safely Smile
        • Nov 14, 2006
          k, thanx a lot, ill keep that in mind. ^__^
        • Nov 14, 2006
          [quote]No prob ^^Done right, lighting is difficult to notice, but done wrong ,it stands out alot and sometimes the mind notices but doesn't understand why. Remember, artistic lisence can allowe alot of unnatral lighting, but learnt the correct way first Then you can break the rules safely[/quote]

          What Ark said there is so totally true. Learn things the right way first and then you'll know when to break the rules.
  • Nov 14, 2006
    Hi my pet rock,
    Here's the critique you requested on this piece.
    Arkillian's critique concerning the colors is correct but I'll try to elaborate on it a bit more. My comments are all regarding coloring in photoshop.

    First let me start by saying the mistakes you are making in coloring in photoshop are completely normal. I made the same mistakes myself when I first started coloring in photoshop.

    In the attached visual critique, I've taken this artwork and removed all of the color. Notice how it's difficult to determine which shapes are part of the tiger and which shapes are the leaves? This is because the shading of the tigers and the leaves have the same 'values.' What does value mean? Value is how light or dark a color is. Why is this important? Well, to our eyes, the most important thing we see is the value. Color is not nearly as important as value. Think of a black and white photograph. It has no color but you can determine exactly what it is you are seeing in the photograph, right?

    If you see the bottom of the attached vis crit you'll notice I've included a screenshot of the photoshop color picker. There are three aspects to every color: hue, value, saturation. In this artwork, you've varried only the hue but haven't varried the values or saturation when you've picked your base colors for the objects. When you select colors next time, pay attention to the saturation of the color you are picking. A chosen color with 0 saturation is grey scale. A color with 100% saturation is a super bright color. Most colors that we find in every day life, especially in nature, are not full saturation.

    So next time you go to color a piece of artwork, after you've filled in the base colors of your artwork, convert it to greyscale to see if the image's composition still holds up. Another trick is to 'squint' at the artwork. If things just mesh together, then the values you've chosen for your shapes aren't good choices. I see similar problems in the color choices in this artwork:
    [thumb7359]

    I think this piece is the most successful photoshop coloring job you've had:
    [thumb9139]
    Image attached
    • Nov 14, 2006
      hey, thanx a lot. ^^
      both you and ark were such a great help, youve given me so much to think about and keep in mind while coloring my next peice, and i really appreciate it.
      thanx again^^
      david